Now playing: 365 Days of Me Time

I started this blog as an exercise in writing, in exploring possibilities and giving a voice to my 30-day experience on the Farmcoast.

Now that I’m home, why stop there?

Shouldn’t we strive to fill our hearts with a little self-indulgence every day? It is our one life to live, no? It is a miracle to have the chances that we do, yes? We are all–each and every one of us–worth it, aren’t we?

You don’t need a hair product commercial to tell yourself you’re worth it. Your zest for life is not going to materialize in a fortune cookie. And you can’t rely on winning the lottery to change your destiny. Let’s face it. One great, amazing thing you can control is how you treat yourself.

So…maybe skip a day of work next week and avoid your email, texts and Facebook pings. Don’t even look. All will be there when you get back to it. And if not, consider yourself lucky.

Sneak into another movie after a movie with overpriced candy in your pockets and perhaps a discreet flask of somethin’ somethin’. That’s right. Just like when you were 15. Because that ridiculous teen in you should always be accessible.

Get into your car and drive without a destination, radio up, windows down and all back roads. Get lost because that’s when you find something truly interesting.

Find an old-world steam bath. Go naked. Sing if you must. Who cares. Not you 20, 30 years from now. So why wait til you get old to be that carefree. F-it. Who cares.

Give your best to your worst guilty pleasure. As long as you’re not making someone else squeamish, I’d say, you are allowed.

365. 24/7. Take it. It’s yours.

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Day 8: I Need A Buddha Break

Screen shot 2015-03-08 at 11.49.24 PMI’ve just been reading my 3rd book by Pema Chodron, an American Buddhist nun, called Start Where You Are: A Guide to Compassionate Living. (Granted, I did have a glass of red wine and a coffee with Bailey’s and Frangelico beforehand.)

Why do I feel like I need martini after a lesson on how to meditate? I’m not kidding, this stuff is dense. I’m open to it. I’m trying to process the logic of leaning into pain and casting away pleasure. Of accepting the good with the bad and appreciating the now. All very elementary distillations of a bunch of maxims (59 in total, I think?) that I’m having a hard time digesting.

I grew up Catholic, for god’s sake. (Note: little “g”.) I have memorized many a prayer and creed which, I daresay, I actually understood as I recited out loud in seemingly blind unison. Just sayin’. I’m capable of parsing parable and practical application. Not to offend anyone on the Buddhist bench, but if you want to persuade the masses, could you make it like, 5th grade reading level?

I digress.

There are a lot of things I agree with in the Buddhist lessons Chodron writes about. I agree with idea that nothing in life is certain and the only way to live without struggle is to embrace that uncertainty and act as you would without fear of consequence. Put simply, “Just do it.” (That Nike is really onto something.) Continue reading